Department of Radiology, Research Hospital The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo


The aim of our research is to apply imaging techniques to biomedical science and clinical medice. We have the following main undergoing research projects:

(1) Development and application of clinical imaging techniques
We develop and improve the image-based methods for clinical diagnosis and assessment of in vivo physiology, and apply these techniques to the analysis of the pathophysiology of various diseases.

 (2) Research of higher brain function using functional MRI
Functional MRI is useful to detect the neurologically activated area. Using psychological tasks, we perform theinvestigation of higher brain function.

(3) Research of small animal imaging and molecular imaging
Before applying new treatment to clinics, the treatment should be tested on small animals like mice and rats.  Recently, imaging techniques such as PET, SPECT, MRI, CT and optical imaging are increasingly used in small animal experiments.  Especially using molecular imaging, which visualize cellular and molecular biological events, biological processes within intact living animals can be evaluated repeatedly and three-dimensionally on a whole body basis.  We develop techniques of small animal imaging and molecular imaging for preclinical study, and also conduct applied study.






In vivo bioluminescence images of a mouse inoculated with leukemia-model cells which express firefly luciferase gene stably. The bioluminescence images visualize whole-body expression of luciferase gene quantitatively. Proliferation of the tumor cells can be assessed repeatedly in an individual mouse.




MRI of the trunk of a mouse inoculated with leukemia-model cells.
Coronal T1-weighted images were obtained after subcutaneous injection of Gd-BOPTA.
Low intensity masses in the liver and splenomegaly are shown.




Bioluminescence, fluorescence, and fusion images in a mouse inoculated with leukemia model cells stably expressing firefly luciferase. Before imaging, the mouse was injected with D-luciferin, substrate for luciferase, and quantum dots. The quantum dots were accumulated in the reticuloendothelial organs.




Gd-BOPTA enhanced MRI in a normal mouse.
Coronal T1-weighted images were obtained after subcutaneous injection of Gd-BOPTA.
Sagittal and axial images wer also generated.




Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI in a normal mouse.
Coronal T1-weighted images were obtained after subcutaneous injection of Gd-DTPA.
Sagittal and axial images were also generated.








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